Wednesday, April 3, 2013

A House of... "Lived in"

I have an insatiable need for order in my home, and some most days it's just the BIG UGLY around here. With homeschooling 4 little children and my own cluttery nature, it's a bit of a losing battle.  


They say "The love of money is the root of all evil" but for me the "love of order" might be more fitting. Nothing brings out the Mommy Monster quicker than a messy kitchen or the Tower of Babel in my laundry room. While order can foster peace and good feelings, the "love of order" can produce the stark opposite.
So, I really loved this mom's take on order in the home. And, the importance of loving people more than our image or our homes. You can see her site HERE.
"Note to Mother: Why do we want a house of order? A house of order provides a comfortable, safe harbor for family and friends. But what happens if life gets in the way?  What happens if Billy has to go to the ER for stitches, when we are doing our Saturday Special Teams stuff?  What happens if Sunday rolls around or friends drop by and the house anything but orderly?


Do you think that is what happened to Martha? Jesus and his followers dropped in on a day, when the bread wouldn’t rise, the goats got out, the next door neighbor’s dog got in the chicken coop, and she was just getting over the flu. Wonderful homemaker that she was, Martha had a plan for visitors—perfect food—perfect surroundings—perfect Martha.  Even though Jesus was important to her, many things troubled her.  Her image of herself as the perfect homemaker got in the way of what was important—time with her friend and Savior. Her expectations of honor and praise got in the way of people.

While we pursue order in our homes, let us not forget the reason for that order—family, friends, and fellowship. Yes, people are more comfortable, when the house is neat, tidy, and organized. But let’s not put the cart before the horse.  When caught unexpectedly, forget embarrassment (or pride as it really is) and focus on people. Growing up in my youthful home, possessions were dearer than people. Stuff was more cherished than children. This was utterly destructive to my little psyche. In your home, put pride aside and let interactions with individuals be more important than image. This is emotional good housekeeping or the lack of emotional homelessness."

2 comments:

MARTHA said...

I always felt so welcomed in your mother's home. I'm sure I'd feel the same about yours no matter what it looked like. Proud of you!

Tiffany said...

It is quite the battle between the fine line of having "a house of order" and "ordering everyone around in the house." I love having a house of order but I don't love love love spending all my time cleaning up after my children--especially if I just cleaned that space. I can't "just let it go" and I can't obsess over it. Such the battle! You are doing a great job!